Wise Words from Adults

One of the cool parts about the interviews we've done has been the range in ages among sibs. We've talked with people our own age, with some younger children, and with a few adults. Though we have loved talking to everyone and are so appreciative that people are willing to open up to strangers, we are especially appreciative of the adults who have reached out to us because their experiences are able to provide us with crucial perspective about how the stigma around having a disability and the experiences that come with being a sib have evolved over the years. We spoke with an adult in North Carolina who was originally from Canada and one of fi children. He shared that when his younger sister was born with Down Syndrome, the practice at the time was to either institutionalize the child or put them in foster care. His family chose the latter option, which meant that his sister was living in another home with a foster family. Though she was still part of the family and they visited frequently, it was confusing for him as a child. His wife observed that all of his siblings have chosen a helping profession and that it might be related to having a sister with a disability.

One of the women we spoke to has an older brother who is developmentally delayed. As a nurse, she did one of her rotations at a state school. She was horrified by the quality of care she encountered. According to her, many of the men there with intellectual disabilities were forced to be the caretakers of the other individuals at the facility. That experience helped her appreciate how fortunate she was to have her brother living with her family at home and provided us with an important historical perspective for understanding the relationship between adults and their siblings during their childhood.

Although the services offered for individuals with special needs and their siblings and family aren't perfect, these interviews, along with Karen's interview (found here), have allowed us to appreciate how far services have come. They've been able to provide important insight into how sibling relationships can evolve over time. Karen, for example, didn't have a great relationship with her two siblings growing up - they loved each other, but they often didn't show it and weren't very affectionate - but now that she and her siblings are older, their relationships have transformed into more affectionate and closer ones. Many of the younger sibs we've talked to have expressed fear or concern about future plans for their siblings when their parents can no longer support them. Talking to older sibs has allowed us to have a better idea about what lies ahead.

Renee