The Sibling Leadership Network, brought to you by a co-founder and the current executive director

Through the extensive network of sibs, we were put in touch with Katie Arnold and John Kramer, two individuals who have been extremely involved in the leadership of the sibling network. John has twin younger brothers, Matt and Mike, who both have disabilities. One has Spina Bifida and the other has Cerebral Palsy and Pervasive Developmental Disorder. He is the outgoing Chair of the Sibling Leadership Network (SLN) and a co-founder of the organization. He is currently the treasurer and a co-founder for the Massachusetts Sibling Support Network. While he was doing his graduate work at the University of Illinois he also helped to co-found Supporting Illinois Brothers and Sisters (SIBS).

Katie is one of five, and one of her younger sisters has an intellectual disability. She is the first Executive Director for the SLN and does this part time as the organization is growing. Katie has also been a part of SLN since its very beginning and the national headquarter of the SLN is hosted by the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois in Chicago where Katie works.

Listen as Katie discusses the beginnings of the Sibling Leadership Network and the first national conference:

In the clip below, John talks about his motivation for co-founding the groups and the angle with which he approaches the disability community.

Katie has been working hard to build momentum for the Sibling Leadership Network and believes that the sib community has a lot of potential to influence change

"For the most part siblings are often overlooked and kind of forgotten, so that's really motivated me to try to build the awareness of the importance of the sibling experience. I've been motivated by trying to get more siblings involved in the work of the disability advocacy movement. I feel like a lot of siblings get that from their family experience, but they aren't always tapped in and involved in the larger disability advocacy movement and I feel like there's a lot of power and potential if more siblings got engaged and involved."

We asked Katie about any advice she might have for a sib who is struggling to get information and start those often difficult conversations with their family.

"There's also a potential for conflict." She says it can be difficult because everyone is going to have different opinions about what is best and there's certainly potential for the conversations to get pretty emotional. "As tough as it is to start, once you start, the momentum will build and it will get a lot easier over time. I know that's happened with my own family." Her family only really meets to talk about it twice a year, when they have a family dinner centered around those conversations. "Just having those two more formal times has really opened this door for our whole family to feel more comfortable talking informally throughout the year and it's helped us all really think about things that we weren't able to before and that's really built over the years."

The SLN presents at a lot of conferences all over the country and talks to a lot of parent groups, just sharing the sibling experience in general so parents have a better insight and awareness from a larger context. They also speak with professionals working in the disability field about ways to engage and work with siblings.

In addition, the SLN has a set of curriculum and resources that is has developed.

Like Katie and other leaders of the SLN, I believe that there is a lot of potential within the sib community to promote positive change (both political and social) around what it means to have a disability and how those individuals and their families are thought of and treated. I was curious about the more specific policy work that the SLN has worked on, and here's her response:

To learn more about the Sibling Leadership Network, check out their website at www.siblingleadership.org.

Renee